AZUMA Takashi
   Department   School of Medicine(Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital), School of Medicine
   Position   Assistant Professor
Article types Original article
Language English
Peer review Peer reviewed
Title Minimally invasive treatment for isolated internal iliac artery aneurysms preserving superior gluteal artery flow.
Journal Formal name:General thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
Abbreviation:Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg
ISSN code:1863-6705/1863-6713
Domestic / ForeginDomestic
Publisher Springer Japan KK
Volume, Issue, Page 67(10),pp.835-840
Author and coauthor DOMOTO Satoru†, AZUMA Takashi, YOKOI Yoshihiko, ISOMURA Shogo, TAKAHASHI Ken, NIINAMI Hiroshi*
Publication date 2019/10
Summary OBJECTIVES:
To prevent buttock claudication, we performed endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for isolated internal iliac aneurysms (IIAAs) with selective preservation of the superior gluteal artery (SGA) flow. This study evaluates early clinical outcomes of this treatment.

METHODS AND RESULTS:
We retrospectively evaluated 6 patients with isolated IIAA who underwent EVAR under local anesthesia between October 2017 and July 2018 at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital. We used self-expanding stent grafts to exclude the IIAA while preserving SGA flow. If necessary, we occluded the inferior gluteal artery and other branches with vascular plugs to prevent type II endoleak. The mean proximal neck diameter and length of the IIAAs to be 9.4 ± 2.4 mm and 17.7 ± 11.3 mm. The mean diameter of the SGA was 6.5 ± 0.9 mm. There were no procedural complications, and the mean procedure time was 84 ± 24 min. All patients were free from buttock claudication at follow-up. Postoperative computed tomography demonstrated a 100% primary patency rate of the SGA stent graft: there was no case of migration or endoleak.

CONCLUSION:
EVAR for IIAAs with SGA flow preservation shows favorable early clinical outcomes. To prevent buttock claudication, SGA flow is necessary and sufficient. This novel approach is less invasive compared to conventional IIAA repair.
DOI 10.1007/s11748-019-01096-5
PMID 30810906